sven

Winter

Experience the Arctic with us!!

 

Husky Tours

We arrange different kind of adventures with our beloved dogs, 2 h northernlight tour, where you sit on a sled that are controlled by a guide, that tells you about the magic lights on the sky. Or a 3 h tour driving you own sled with your friend, partner sitting and chatting in the basket of the sled. Daytours, 2 daytours, 3 or longer, we also can make a special tour on request if you want something extra. Maybe you have sleddogs and want to try them out in a team on a tour. We just love to travel with these remarkable animals so every tour is a journey with them our furry friends. See programs for more info about prices and dates for a husky tour. The equipment we use toboggan sleds and we have a cooperation with a couple that make our equipment, it’s very good stuff and professional. (Vildmannens drag annons) .( bild på utrustning och förare. )

 

Snowmobile

A snowmobile, also known in some places as a snowmachine, or sled, is a land vehicle for winter travel on snow. Designed to be operated on snow and ice, they require no road or trail. Design variations enable some machines to operate in deep snow or forests; most are used on open terrain, including frozen lakes, or driven on paths or trails. Usually designed to accommodate a driver and one passenger, their use is much like a motorcycle and an all-terrain vehicle (ATVs) intended for winter use on snow-covered ground and frozen ponds and waterways. They have no enclosure except for a windshield and their engine normally drives a continuous track or tracks at the rear; skis at the front provide directional control. There no clutch on a snowmobile, its reacting direct on the throttle.

We can offer multiday snowmobile tours to just a short try out. In all of our programs its included different snowmobile tours. We use helmets for all our guests on these activities.

 

Crosscountry

Cross-country skiing originated in Fennoscandian countries in prehistoric times. It was still widely practiced in the 19th century as a way of moving from place to place in winter. Elk, deer and other animals were hunted by skiing. Nowadays many people in countries with strong cross-country skiing traditions — like Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia and Latvia — have used or regularly use skis. By contrast skiing is relatively new in North America and was introduced by Norwegian and Swedish immigrants in the 1850s. Snowshoe Thompson is widely credited for introducing the sport to California in the USA. In Canada pioneers included Aldolf Olsen, Sigurd and Hans Lockeberg and Jackrabbit Johannsen. In Canada, although Johannsen never claimed to be the first skier in Canada, he had a major role in stimulating an interest in the sport. He organized races, officiated events, and served as a guide, coach, and consultant for numerous skiing organizations, many of which he helped to found. An enthusiastic teacher, he helped coach Canada’s Olympic team in 1932. At the age of 55, he shocked his Canadian Olympic pupils as he accompanied the team step by step through its rigorous training schedule—and still he had energy to spare. This was, however, still quite far from being the twilight of Jackrabbit’s incredible skiing career, as he didn’t ski his last official race until the age of 75, and still glided through the snowy woods on a daily basis well past the age of 100. This form of skiing has been used by explorers as a means of transport, and all Nordic armies have ski-trained infantry for winter operations. Skis gave important mobility to the Finnish army during the Winter War and allowed the small groups of Finns to beat large armies of Russians. Similar tactics that utilize skis have been used in many times by the Finns and Karelians in the past. Pre-modern skiing troops were armed with crossbows and ski poles which had a spearhead on the other end. Traditionally, all of the equipment was made of natural materials: wooden skis and bamboo poles with leather hand straps. Footwear was usually sturdy leather boots with thick soles. Bindings evolved from simple straps made of twisted wood-based thread, to the so-called Kandahar binding with the fastening of both the boot’s front and back, to the ‘Rat Trap’ front-only binding, which is today known as the Nordic norm, and has evolved in various modern bindings

This activity is include in many program and if you like it you can borrow ski equipment and use them in your free time or book a guide to show you more tracks and learn you to ski even better.

Snowshoeing

A snowshoe is footwear for walking over the snow. Snowshoes work by distributing the weight of the person over a larger area so that the person’s foot does not sink completely into the snow, a quality called “flotation”. Traditional snowshoes have a hardwood frame with rawhide lacings. Some modern snowshoes are similar, but most are made of materials such as lightweight metal, plastic, and synthetic fabric. In addition to distributing the weight, snowshoes are generally raised at the toe for maneuverability. They must not accumulate snow, hence the latticework, and require bindings to attach them to the feet. In the past, snowshoes were essential tools for fur traders, trappers and anyone whose life or living depended on the ability to get around in areas of deep and frequent snowfall, and they remain necessary equipment for forest rangers and others who must be able to get around areas inaccessible to motorized vehicles when the snow is deep. However, today snowshoes are mainly used for recreation, primarily by hikers and runners who like to continue their hobby in wintertime. Snowshoeing is easy to learn, and in appropriate conditions is a relatively safe and inexpensive recreational activity. However, snowshoeing in icy, steep terrain is more dangerous.

This activity is include in many program and if you like it you can borrow equipment and use them in your free time or book a guide to show you more nice places and new trails.

 

Icefishing

Ice fishing methods have changed drastically over the past 20 years. The name of the game is Mobility for today’s modern ice anglers. The days of drilling one hole, waiting and hoping that a fish will swim by, are starting to fade. With light gear, battery-operated sonar units, and fast and powered augers, an angler can conceivably drill and check hundreds of holes in a single day. When the fish stop biting where they are, anglers can move to the next hole, checking it with their sonar first to look for activity, and if there are no fish they will keep moving until fish are found. In addition, schools of fish tend to move around; so a hole may be productive for 10 minutes and then slow down to nothing for an hour before a school returns to that location. This “fish where the fish are” technique and ease of mobility increases the catch rate of any angler, because it minimizes the wait between bites, similar to “trolling” in summer.

Anglers can now use many available maps and surveys to help pinpoint lakes and areas within those lakes that make sense to try for specific fish, noting those locations in latitude and longitude coordinates. They are then able to use a handheld GPS receiver to aim them to those spots, usually with accuracy of less than 20 feet. Ice anglers then drill holes with whichever auger they have, checking the ice thickness for safety as they go. Using sonar, the angler can determine the depth of the water, bottom content, weed and structure cover, and even see if there are fish there. Also, by using sonar, they can place the bait according to where they think the fish are. If they are using “tip-ups” they can carpet the area at different depths and with different presentations (the number allowed being determined by local laws) and see what is the most productive. Modern ice anglers can also use modern reels mounted on shorter (18″-36″/45–90 cm long) fishing rods to actively fish by watching, by using their sonar, where their lure is relative to the fish, and jig accordingly to entice a bite.

Ice fishing can be done at any time of day, and is typically most active around dusk and dawn. Different fish are active at different times of day, so anglers need to fish for them accordingly. There are fishhouses large enough and comforable enough to spend many days in a row out on the lake, fishing the entire time. One can even fish in one’s sleep, by using audible alarms on one’s lines to tell when a fish is biting. There are also many lightweight and highly mobile portable shelters that mount on plastic sleds and collapse for transportation. These can vary from small, one-person shelters (commonly and affectionably called “Fish Traps”) to large and complex shelters able to fit up to 6 people at once.

This activity is include in many program and if you like it you can borrow equipment and use them in your free time or book a guide to show you how to catch a fish.

 

 Upplev norra Sverige med oss!!

 

Husky Turer

Vi arrangerar olika sorters äventyr med våra älskade hundar. 2 Timmars kvällstur där du sitter i en släde kontrollerad av en guide, som berättar om det magiska ljuset på himlen. Eller en 2,5 timmars tur körandes din egen släde med en vän/partner sittandes i släden. Dagsturer, 2 dagars, 3 eller längre, vi kan också specialdesigna en tur på begäran om du vill ha något extra. Kanske har du slädhundar och vill pröva dem i ett team på en tur. Vi älskar att resa med dessa speciella djur so varje tur är en resa med våra håriga vänner. Se programmen för mer information om priser och datum för våra turer. Utrustingen vi använder är träslädar och vi samarbetar med ett par som gör våran utrustning och den är av mycket god kvalitet.

Snöskoter

En snöskoter, också kallad för snömaskin eller släde, är en maskin för resor i vinterlandskapet. Tillverkad för att kunna användas både på snö och is och behöver varken väg eller spår. Vissa maskiner är designade för att kunna köra i djup snö eller skog, de flesta används i öppen terräng eller på frusna sjöar och älvar eller körs på spår. Vanligtvis designade för att kunna ta en förare och en passagerare, deras användning liknar mycket en motorcykel och en terränggående maskin menad för att användas under vinter på snötäckt mark och frusna sjöar och vattenvägar.

Vi kan erbjuda från flerdagarsturer till korta prova på. I de flesta program inkluderas olika snöskoter turer. Vi använder hjälmar till alla våra gäster under dessa aktiviteter. 

Crosscountry

Cross-country skiing originated in Fennoscandian countries in prehistoric times. It was still widely practiced in the 19th century as a way of moving from place to place in winter. Elk, deer and other animals were hunted by skiing. Nowadays many people in countries with strong cross-country skiing traditions — like Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia and Latvia — have used or regularly use skis. By contrast skiing is relatively new in North America and was introduced by Norwegian and Swedish immigrants in the 1850s. Snowshoe Thompson is widely credited for introducing the sport to California in the USA. In Canada pioneers included Aldolf Olsen, Sigurd and Hans Lockeberg and Jackrabbit Johannsen. In Canada, although Johannsen never claimed to be the first skier in Canada, he had a major role in stimulating an interest in the sport. He organized races, officiated events, and served as a guide, coach, and consultant for numerous skiing organizations, many of which he helped to found. An enthusiastic teacher, he helped coach Canada’s Olympic team in 1932. At the age of 55, he shocked his Canadian Olympic pupils as he accompanied the team step by step through its rigorous training schedule—and still he had energy to spare. This was, however, still quite far from being the twilight of Jackrabbit’s incredible skiing career, as he didn’t ski his last official race until the age of 75, and still glided through the snowy woods on a daily basis well past the age of 100. This form of skiing has been used by explorers as a means of transport, and all Nordic armies have ski-trained infantry for winter operations. Skis gave important mobility to the Finnish army during the Winter War and allowed the small groups of Finns to beat large armies of Russians. Similar tactics that utilize skis have been used in many times by the Finns and Karelians in the past. Pre-modern skiing troops were armed with crossbows and ski poles which had a spearhead on the other end. Traditionally, all of the equipment was made of natural materials: wooden skis and bamboo poles with leather hand straps. Footwear was usually sturdy leather boots with thick soles. Bindings evolved from simple straps made of twisted wood-based thread, to the so-called Kandahar binding with the fastening of both the boot’s front and back, to the ‘Rat Trap’ front-only binding, which is today known as the Nordic norm, and has evolved in various modern bindings

This activity is include in many program and if you like it you can borrow ski equipment and use them in your free time or book a guide to show you more tracks and learn you to ski even better.

Snowshoeing

A snowshoe is footwear for walking over the snow. Snowshoes work by distributing the weight of the person over a larger area so that the person’s foot does not sink completely into the snow, a quality called “flotation”. Traditional snowshoes have a hardwood frame with rawhide lacings. Some modern snowshoes are similar, but most are made of materials such as lightweight metal, plastic, and synthetic fabric. In addition to distributing the weight, snowshoes are generally raised at the toe for maneuverability. They must not accumulate snow, hence the latticework, and require bindings to attach them to the feet. In the past, snowshoes were essential tools for fur traders, trappers and anyone whose life or living depended on the ability to get around in areas of deep and frequent snowfall, and they remain necessary equipment for forest rangers and others who must be able to get around areas inaccessible to motorized vehicles when the snow is deep. However, today snowshoes are mainly used for recreation, primarily by hikers and runners who like to continue their hobby in wintertime. Snowshoeing is easy to learn, and in appropriate conditions is a relatively safe and inexpensive recreational activity. However, snowshoeing in icy, steep terrain is more dangerous.

This activity is include in many program and if you like it you can borrow equipment and use them in your free time or book a guide to show you more nice places and new trails.

 

Icefishing

Ice fishing methods have changed drastically over the past 20 years. The name of the game is Mobility for today’s modern ice anglers. The days of drilling one hole, waiting and hoping that a fish will swim by, are starting to fade. With light gear, battery-operated sonar units, and fast and powered augers, an angler can conceivably drill and check hundreds of holes in a single day. When the fish stop biting where they are, anglers can move to the next hole, checking it with their sonar first to look for activity, and if there are no fish they will keep moving until fish are found. In addition, schools of fish tend to move around; so a hole may be productive for 10 minutes and then slow down to nothing for an hour before a school returns to that location. This “fish where the fish are” technique and ease of mobility increases the catch rate of any angler, because it minimizes the wait between bites, similar to “trolling” in summer.

Anglers can now use many available maps and surveys to help pinpoint lakes and areas within those lakes that make sense to try for specific fish, noting those locations in latitude and longitude coordinates. They are then able to use a handheld GPS receiver to aim them to those spots, usually with accuracy of less than 20 feet. Ice anglers then drill holes with whichever auger they have, checking the ice thickness for safety as they go. Using sonar, the angler can determine the depth of the water, bottom content, weed and structure cover, and even see if there are fish there. Also, by using sonar, they can place the bait according to where they think the fish are. If they are using “tip-ups” they can carpet the area at different depths and with different presentations (the number allowed being determined by local laws) and see what is the most productive. Modern ice anglers can also use modern reels mounted on shorter (18″-36″/45–90 cm long) fishing rods to actively fish by watching, by using their sonar, where their lure is relative to the fish, and jig accordingly to entice a bite.

Ice fishing can be done at any time of day, and is typically most active around dusk and dawn. Different fish are active at different times of day, so anglers need to fish for them accordingly. There are fishhouses large enough and comforable enough to spend many days in a row out on the lake, fishing the entire time. One can even fish in one’s sleep, by using audible alarms on one’s lines to tell when a fish is biting. There are also many lightweight and highly mobile portable shelters that mount on plastic sleds and collapse for transportation. These can vary from small, one-person shelters (commonly and affectionably called “Fish Traps”) to large and complex shelters able to fit up to 6 people at once.

This activity is include in many program and if you like it you can borrow equipment and use them in your free time or book a guide to show you how to catch a fish.